69+ Homeowners vs. Renters Statistics (2022 Data)

Did you know that 36% of American households currently rent their home?
You’re about to see a list of up-to-date statistics on the number of renters vs. owners.

All of the statistics we’ve compiled are current and up-to-date.

Keep reading to find new stats, facts, and trends related to:

  • Number of homeowners vs. renters
  • Homeownership rates by country, state, race, and age
  • Homeownership demographics
  • Rental statistics
  • Rental demographics
  • Homeowners vs. renters by state
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats!

Homeowners vs. Renters Statistics: By The Numbers

  1. There has been a decline in homeownership, with 36% of American households currently renting rather than owning their home. (iPropertyManagement)
  2. 65% of renters are young adults. (Policy Genius)
  3. 78.7 million out of a total 122.8 million households are homeowning. (iPropertyManagement)
  4. There are 44.1 million households that rent their homes. (iPropertyManagement)
  5. Only 45% of renters could afford to buy a property in their city, going by the average home price in their city (Flex)
  6. In the United States, homeowners have a median household income of $72,615. (Flex)
  7. White households hold the highest home ownership rate, at a rate of 73.8%. (Flex)
  8. New York is the city with the most renters, housing a whopping 5,414,256 renters (64.6% of the population). (Governing)
  9. In the past 50 years, rent payments in the United States have increased by 61%. (Policy Advice)
  10. West Virginia is the cheapest state both to rent in and buy property in. In West Virginia, the average real estate cost is only $169,000 on average. (Policy Advice)
  11. The home ownership rate is highest for those aged 65 and up, at 79.3%. (Wood Group Mortgage)
  12. As of October 2020, the median asking rate for vacant rental units was $1,160 in the U.S. (Policy Genius)

Chapter 1: Homeowners vs. Renters

Homeowners Renters
Number of Households 78,716,628 44,086,224
Share of Households 64.1% 35.9%
Average Monthly Payments $1,297 mortgage* $1,149 rent
Total Monthly Housing Costs† $1,510 $1,301
Vacancy Rate 0.9% 6.2%
Median Household Wealth $254,900 ($98,500 excluding home equity) $6,270

*Among households with at least one regular mortgage.
Including insurance, taxes, and utilities.

Line Graph of Homeownership Rates Since 1965
Source: ipropertymanagement.com

Housing Affordability Among Homeowners vs. Renters

There are many factors that go into the affordability of owning homes rather than renting for people. While 72% of renters report wanting to own a home, only 45% of renters are able to afford a home where they live.

There are several factors that go into this affordability, including income. One often overlooked factor is insurance.

The estimated average cost of homeowners insurance per year is $1200 in the U.S. Meanwhile, the average cost for renters insurance in the U.S. is only $180. 

The average monthly mortgage costs $1,609, whereas the average monthly rent payment comes in at $1,641 to $2,012, depending on unit size. 

While the mortgage payment is less on average than the rent payment, it is important to note that the mortgage is in addition to a down payment. The average down payment on a house is 12%. So, for the average U.S. home price of $408,800, the down payment would cost $49,056. 

While monthly mortgage prices are less than monthly rent prices, a home buyer must be able to afford a down payment, which is a significant ($49,056) investment. 

Housing Vacancy Among Homeowners vs. Renters

rental vacancy rates by region
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

In the graph above, we see that in 2021, rental vacancy rates average 4%-7%. The region with the highest rental vacancy rate is the South, at 7.2%, while the Northeast has the lowest rental vacancy rate, at 4.3%. 

In 2020, the homeowner vacancy rate was only 1% in the United States. This is at least 4% lower than the lowest rental vacancy rate of 2020, which was in the West, at 5.1%. 

Homeowner vs. Renter Demographics

In the under-35 age group, 65% of American households are rented. Meanwhile, in the 65+ age group (senior citizens), 79.3% own a home. 

The median age of homebuyers is 47 years old, while the median age of renters is 38 years old. 

A whopping 64% of millennials who own homes regret their purchase of a home. Meanwhile, only 33% of baby boomers feel the same way.

Cities Where Renters Have The Largest Majority

City Renting Rate
Waterbury, CT 60.8%
Springfield, MO 59.1%
Fayetteville, NC 56.4%
Birmingham, AL 56.2%
Yonkers, NY 54.9%
Irvine, CA 54.3%
Lowell, MA 53.3%
Downey, CA 53.2%
Boulder, CO 53.2%
Fargo, ND 52.9%
National Map: Share of Households that are Homeowning, Homeowner vs Renter Statistics
Source: ipropertymanagement.com

Homeowner vs. Renter Household Wealth

Renters and homeowners differ in median income by over $30,000. While renters have a median income of $40,500, homeowners have a median income of $72,615. The homeowner median income is higher than the national median household income, which is $68,703.

Homeowners and renters alike spend over 15% of their income on housing, but how much they actually spend differs by over 13%. 

National Map: The Difference Between Median Mortgage Payment and Median Monthly Rent, by state, Homeowner vs Renter Statistics
Source: ipropertymanagement.com

Among homeowners, an average of 16.4% of their income goes to housing costs. This includes mortgage, property taxes and homeowner’s insurance. 

Meanwhile, 45% of renters spend over 30% of their household income on housing costs. 

7.5% of recipients of Covid stimulus money used the money to pay a mortgage, while 10.3% of Covid stimulus recipients used the funds to pay their rent.

Credit scores also tend to differ among homeowners and renters. Renters have an average credit score of 638. Meanwhile, homeowners’ credit score is 731.

Chapter 2: Homeownership Statistics

Home Ownership Rates By Country

When compared with the rest of the world, the U.S. does not have home ownership rates nearly as high as other developed countries. Let’s take a look at the top ten countries with the highest home ownership rates.

Country Homeownership Rate
Romania 96.4%
Singapore 90.8%
Slovakia 90.3%
Cuba 90%
Croatia 89.7%
Lithuania 89.4%
India 86.6%
Hungary 86.3%
Russia 84%
Poland 83.5%

Meanwhile, the home ownership rate in the U.S. sits at 65.4%, nearly 20% lower than the tenth highest rate on the above list (Poland, 83.5%). Why might the U.S. homeownership rate be so much lower?

One possibility is the cost of homes. In Romania, the cost per square meter of housing is only $932.02. 

Home Ownership Rates By State

There are several factors that drive homeownership rates amongst the various U.S. states. Let’s look at the rates and see if we notice patterns.

National Map: Share of Households that Rent, by state, Homeowner vs Renter Statistics
Source: ipropertymanagement.com

Homeowners vs. Renters By State

State Total Households % Owning : % Renting‡
Alabama 1,897,576 69% : 31%
Alaska 252,199 65% : 35%
Arizona 2,670,441 65% : 35%
Arkansas 1,163,647 66% : 35%
California 13,157,873 55% : 45%
Colorado 2,235,103 66% : 34%
Connecticut 1,377,166 65% : 35%
Delaware 376,239 70% : 30%
D.C. 291,570 42% : 59%
Florida 7,905,832 66% : 34%
Georgia 3,852,714 64% : 36%
Hawaii 465,299 60% : 40%
Idaho 655,859 72% : 28%
Illinois 4,866,006 66% : 34%
Indiana 2,597,765 69% : 31%
Iowa 1,287,221 71% : 30%
Kansas 1,138,329 67% : 34%
Kentucky 1,748,732 67% : 33%
Louisiana 1,741,076 67% : 34%
Maine 573,618 72% : 28%
Maryland 2,226,767 67% : 33%
Massachusetts 2,650,680 62% : 38%
Michigan 3,969,880 72% : 28%
Minnesota 2,222,568 72% : 28%
Mississippi 1,100,229 67% : 33%
Missouri 2,458,337 67% : 33%
Montana 437,651 67% : 33%
Nebraska 771,444 66% : 34%
Nevada 1,143,557 57% : 43%
New Hampshire 541,396 71% : 29%
New Jersey 3,286,264 63% : 37%
New Mexico 793,420 68% : 32%
New York 7,446,812 54% : 47%
North Carolina 4,046,348 65% : 35%
North Dakota 323,519 61% : 39%
Ohio 4,730,340 66% : 34%
Oklahoma 1,495,151 66% : 35%
Oregon 1,649,352 63% : 37%
Pennsylvania 5,119,249 68% : 32%
Puerto Rico 1,170,982 69% : 31%
Rhode Island 407,174 62% : 38%
South Carolina 1,975,915 70% : 30%
South Dakota 353,799 68% : 32%
Tennessee 2,654,737 67% : 34%
Texas 9,985,126 62% : 38%
Utah 1,023,855 71% : 29%
Vermont 262,767 71% : 29%
Virginia 3,191,847 66% : 34%
Washington 2,932,477 63% : 37%
West Virginia 728,175 73% : 27%
Wisconsin 2,386,623 67% : 33%
Wyoming 233,128 72% : 28%
Alabama

In Alabama, the homeownership rate is 72.5%, beating the national average by 10.5%. Although the rates here are high, they are on the decline; homeownership has declined in Alabama by 5.0% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Alabama is 0.6% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Alaska

The Alaska homeownership rate is 63.9%. This is 2.6% below the national average. Homeownership here has decreased 4.1% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Alaska is 0.8% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Arizona

The Arizona homeownership rate is 64.5%, 8.1% lower than in 2005, and 1.7% below the national average. Arizona homeownership rates are both below average and on the decline. Currently, homeownership in Arizona is 2.8% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Arkansas

The Arkansas homeownership rate is 63.7%. It has decreased 9.9% since 2005, and is below the national average by 2.9%. Currently, homeownership in Arkansas is 6.0% higher than the 15-year average rate.

California

Rents are becoming increasingly popular in California. The homeownership rate in California is 54.5%, 16.9% below the national average and on the decline; homeownership in California has decreased 9.3% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in California is 2.5% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Colorado

The homeownership rate in Colorado sits at 63.6%, 3.0% below the national average. The homeownership rate is decreasing, having been 9.3% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Colorado is 3.7% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Connecticut

The Connecticut homeownership rate is 66.1%, 0.8% higher than the national average. This rate is 8.4% lower than the 2005 Connecticut homeownership rate. Currently, homeownership in Connecticut is 3.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Delaware

The Delaware homeownership rate is well above the national average, at 72.7%. This beats the national average by 10.8%. However, homeownership is decreasing here as well, having been 4.1% in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Delaware is 2.4% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Florida

The homeownership rate in Florida is 68.1%, 3.8% above the national average. This number has decreased by 5.9% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Florida is 0.3% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Georgia

In Georgia, homeownership is equal to the national average, sitting at 65.6%. This has decreased 6.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Georgia is 0.2% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Hawaii

Hawaii has a homeownership rate of 60.2%. While this is 8.2% below the national average, it has increased by 2.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Hawaii is 2.8% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Idaho

The Idaho homeownership rate is 70.2%, which is 7.0% above the national average. This rate has decreased by 2.2% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Idaho is 2.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Illinois

The homeownership rate in Illinois is 67.8%, beating the national average by 3.4%. This rate was 4.4% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Illinois is 0.4% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Indiana

Homeownership is quite popular in Indiana, with a rate of 74.7%. This is 13.9% above the national average, and the rate has only decreased by 0.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Indiana is 5.0% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Iowa

Iowa has a homeownership rate of 70.4%, 7.3% above the national average. This number has decreased by 4.0% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Iowa is 1.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Kansas

The Kansas homeownership rate is 68.9%, which is 5.0% above the national average. In Kansas, homeownership has increased by 0.7% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Kansas is 2.1% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Kentucky

Kentucky’s homeownership rates sits at 69.8%, 6.4% above the national average. The rate has decreased 2.6% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Kentucky is 0.1% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Louisiana

The Louisiana homeownership rate is 70.1%, 6.9% above the national average. This represents a decrease of 4.1% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Louisiana is 2.0% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Maine

Maine has an extremely high homeownership rate, at 75.3%. This is 14.8% above the national average. Moreover, the homeownership rate in Maine is increasing; the rate is 2.0% higher than in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Maine is 2.0% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Maryland

Homeownership rates in Maryland are stable, at 69.6%, 6.1% above the national average. This number is 2.2% lower than in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Maryland is 1.3% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, the homeownership rate is 62.3%. This is 5.0% below the national average, and has decreased 1.7% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Massachusetts is 1.6% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Michigan

Michigan has a homeownership rate of 72.2%, 10.1% above the national average. However, this is in decline; the rate has decreased 5.7% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Michigan is 3.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Minnesota

Minnesota has a high homeownership rate, sitting at 73.4%, 11.9% above the national average. Since 2005, homeownership in Minnesota has decreased 2.9%. Currently, homeownership in Minnesota is 1.3% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Mississippi

Mississippi homeownership has a rate of 71.2%, which is 8.5% above the national average. This has decreased 8.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Mississippi is 4.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Missouri

Missouri homeownership is high and increasing; the rate is currently 71.6%, which is 9.1% above the national average. This is an increase of 0.3% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Missouri is 1.6% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Montana

The Montana homeownership rate is 68.3%. This is 4.1% above the national average, and it has decreased 0.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Montana is 0.1% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Nebraska

The homeownership rate in Nebraska is 67.4%. This number is 2.9% higher than the national average, having decreased 1.7% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Nebraska is 0.8% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Nevada

Nevada has a home ownership rate of 58.3%. This is 11.1% below the national average, and it is decreasing; since 2005 home ownership in Nebraska has decreased by 8.6%. Currently, homeownership in Nevada is 1.3% lower than the 15-year average rate.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire has a high homeownership rate, sitting at 76.1%, 16.0% above the national average. Since 2005, homeownership in New Hampshire has decreased 1.9%. Currently, homeownership in New Hampshire is 3.3% higher than the 15-year average rate.

New Jersey

New Jersey homeownership is below average; the rate is currently 65.2%, which is 0.6% below the national average. This is a decrease of 7.0% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in New Jersey is 1.0% lower than the 15-year average rate.

New Mexico

The New Mexico homeownership rate is 70.8%. This is 7.9% below the national average, and it has decreased 1.3% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in New Mexico is 2.4% higher than the 15-year average rate.

New York

The homeownership rate in New York is one of the lowest in the U.S., at 54.0%. This number is 17.7% higher than the national average, having decreased 3.6% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in New York is 0.7% higher than the 15-year average rate.

North Carolina

In North Carolina, the homeownership rate is 66.3%. This is 10.7% above the national average, and has decreased 7.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in North Carolina is 1.3% lower than the 15-year average rate.

North Dakota

The homeownership rate in North Dakota sits at 61.8%, 5.8% below the national average. The homeownership rate is decreasing, having been 8.0% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in North Dakota is 4.1% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Ohio

The Ohio homeownership rate is 67.9%, which is 3.5% above the national average. In Ohio, homeownership has decreased by 7.5% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Ohio is 1.9% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Oklahoma

The Oklahoma homeownership rate is 68.4%. This is 4.3% above the national average, and it has decreased 5.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Oklahoma is 1.8% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Oregon

The Oregon homeownership rate is 63.7%, which is 2.9% below the national average. In Oregon, homeownership has decreased by 9.1% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Oregon is 1.3% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, the homeownership rate is 71.3%. This is 5.7% below the national average, and has decreased 3.3% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Pennsylvania is 0.4% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Rhode Island

The homeownership rate in Rhode Island sits at 62.9%, 4.1% below the national average. The homeownership rate is decreasing, having been 1.4% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Rhode Island is 1.3% higher than the 15-year average rate.

South Carolina

The South Carolina homeownership rate is 71.3%, 8.7% higher than the national average. This rate is 3.1% lower than the 2005 Connecticut homeownership rate. Currently, homeownership in South Carolina is 0.9% lower than the 15-year average rate.

South Dakota

The South Dakota homeownership rate is 71.8%, which is 9.5% above the national average. In Kansas, homeownership has increased by 3.2% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in South Dakota is 3.2% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Tennessee

The Tennessee homeownership rate is 67.6%. This is 3.0% above the national average, and it has decreased 5.8% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Tennessee is 2.1% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Texas

The homeownership rate in Texas sits at 64.8%, 1.2% below the national average. The homeownership rate has decreased, having been 1.8% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Texas is 1.2% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Utah

In Utah, the homeownership rate is 72.2%. This is 10.1% above the national average, and has decreased 1.1% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Utah is 0.2% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Vermont

The Vermont homeownership rate is 73.1%, 11.4% higher than the national average. This rate is 2.3% lower than the 2005 Vermont homeownership rate. Currently, homeownership in Vermont is equal to the 15-year average rate.

Virginia

The Virginia homeownership rate is 66.5%. This is 1.4% above the national average, and it has decreased 8.7% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Virginia is 3.7% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Washington

The homeownership rate in Washington sits at 62.4%, 4.9% below the national average. The homeownership rate is decreasing, having been 9.8% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Washington is 2.7% lower than the 15-year average rate.

West Virginia

The West Virginia homeownership rate is the highest in the nation, at 78.8%, which is 20.1% above the national average. In West Virginia, homeownership has decreased by 1.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in West Virginia is 1.5% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, the homeownership rate is 70.1%. This is 6.9% above the national average, and has decreased 0.4% since 2005. Currently, homeownership in Wisconsin is 0.8% higher than the 15-year average rate.

Wyoming

The homeownership rate in Wyoming sits at 71.1%, 8.4% above the national average. The homeownership rate is decreasing, having been 4.0% higher in 2005. Currently, homeownership in Wyoming is 1.4% lower than the 15-year average rate.

Home Ownership Rates By Race

Different races differ significantly in their homeownership rates in the U.S. Here are the stats on homeownership by race:

Race Homeownership Rate
White, non-Hispanic 73.3%
Black 42.1%
Hispanic or Latino 47.5%
Native Americans or Alaska Natives 50.8%
Asian or Pacific Islander 57.7%

The largest gap is between Black and white, non-Hispanic Americans. This gap is over 30%. 

Since 1994, homeownership has increased by over six percentage points among both Hispanic or Latino and Asian or Pacific Islander Americans.

Home Ownership Rates By Age

Homeownership differs vastly among different age groups. Check out the statistics below for information on different age groups and their home ownership rates.

Age Homeownership Rate
Under 35 years old 38.1%
35-44 years old 62%
45-54 years old 69.4%
55-64 years old 75.7%
65 years and older 79.3%

As is shown above, homeownership increases as age increases.

Home Ownership Rates By Generation

Older generations tend to be more likely to own homes. In 2019, the generational home ownership rates correlated with the rates of their respective ages. Here are the rates:

Generation Homeownership Rate
The Silent Generation (born 1928-1945) 77.3%
Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) 77.1%
Generation X (born 1965-1980) 67.0%
Millennials (born 1981-1996) 43.3%

The Silent Generation and Baby Boomers have nearly identical homeownership rates, at 77.3%. Generation X has over ten percent less, and millennials exhibit a huge drop in home ownership rate, sitting at 43.3%.

Chapter 3: Homeowner Demographics

White households have the highest rate of home ownership, at 73.8%. Meanwhile, 53% of Hispanic households and 58% of Black households rent their homes. 

Among senior citizens (age 65+), the home ownership rate is 79.3%. The next highest group of home ownership is also the next oldest group, ages 55-64. 75.7% of adults aged 55-64 own their homes.

The trend of age continues even younger than the 55-64 year-old age group. 45 to 54-year-olds have a 69.4% home ownership rate, and 62.0% of 35 to 44-year-olds own a home. 

Chapter 4: Rental Statistics

U.S. Rental Statistics

In 2021, the U.S. held over 44.1 million rental households. These made up around 36% of all housing units. 11% of housing units are vacant. 

Line Graph of the number of Owner occupied homes and the number of Renter occupied homes since 2005
Source: ipropertymanagement.com

U.S. Cities With The Most Renters

Renting is most prevalent in large cities such as New York. Meanwhile, some suburbs have fewer than one in ten residents as renters.

Many cities have experienced gains in renting homes over recent years. The following is a summary of the U.S. cities with the most renters:

City Renters Percent of Population
New York, New York 5,414,256 64.6%
Los Angeles, California 2,321,544 60.1%
Chicago, Illinois 1,371,799 51.5%
Houston, Texas 1,198,145 53.6%
Phoenix, Arizona 715,049 45.9%
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 678,352 44.6%
San Antonio, Texas 597,063 41.5%
San Diego, California 704,396 52.0%
Dallas, Texas 697,154 54.4%
San Jose, California 418,053 41.5%

All of these cities have significant renter populations, with the U.S. seeing the most renters today since 1965. 

Key Takeaway: Renting is most prevalent in big cities rather than rural areas. 

How Much Do Renters Spend on Rent?

A whopping 20.4 million renters spend over 30% of their household income on rent. 24% pay more than 50% of their income to rent.

17.5% of renters live in 2-4 unit buildings. 65% of single family renters are living in 1 or 2 bedroom houses, while 25% live in homes with 3 bedrooms. 

Key Takeaway: Renting is becoming more and more popular in the U.S., with many renters spending significant portions of their income on rent. 

Chapter 5: Rental Demographics

Rental households are more likely to be single when compared with their home owning counterparts. 

16.9 million, 38.3% of renting households are single occupant. Meanwhile, 48.2 million homeowners, which is 61.2%, are married, both spouses being present.

4 million renters are unmarried couples with both partners present and living there. 

3.6 million veterans rent their homes. At the same time, 8 million veterans own their homes.

Key Takeaway: Rentals are most common among singles.

Household Wealth Among Renters

Among renters, the median household wealth is $6,270. This is only 5.1% of the median wealth among all households. Black renters have the lowest median household wealth, at $1,830.

Among Hispanic-identifying renters, the median household wealth is $5,800. Among Asian and all other races, the median renter wealth is $6,710.  

Key Takeaway: Renting is most common in urban communities, especially among minorities in the U.S. 

Sources

  1. U. S. Census Bureau, American Housing Survey
  2. Census, American Community Survey
  3. National Association of Realtors, Research and Statistics
  4. Housing Vacancies and Homeownership (CPS/HVS)
  5. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, The State of the Nation’s Housing 2021
  6. National Multifamily Housing Council, Research & Insight
  7. Research and Statistics National Association of Realtors
  8. 2020 Census Group Quarters
  9. High-Frequency COVID Economic Impact Data
  10. Move.org, Is It More Common to Rent or Own in Each State?
  11. RentCafe, Renters vs Owners: Renting Dips Over the Decade, But Claims Majority in 23 Cities, Including Seattle & Pittsburgh

Conclusion

That is it for this list of statistics on homeowners and renters.

I learned a lot when putting this list together, and I hope you did too.

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